Defending the family

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South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem Damages Herself and harms all women by her betrayal

Eugene Delgaudio, president of Public Advocate said "Public Advocate swiftly condemned the announcement to veto the bill passed by South Dakota legislators to bar men in women's sports from the start. We asked our supporters nationwide several times to demand Kristi Noem sign the bill and thank the legislators for not allowing her public deception and constant blatant betrayal of all women on the last day of their session."


The Federalist's Joy Pullman reports:

Kristi Noem Has No Good Explanations For Vetoing The Girls' Sports Bill

To truly fight, Gov. Kristi Noem should have signed the bill and demanded her state legislature pass more, such as a ban on the transgender mutilation of minors.


Since reversing her support to finally veto a bill that would have required only females to play on female sports teams, South Dakota Kristi Noem has kicked up a whirlwind of rhetorical dirt about her decision. It all seems designed to confuse people about the key fact that she had a bill on her desk that would have outlawed males unfairly playing girls, and she vetoed it.

Many of her arguments for this decision contradict themselves, or her own actions. For example, Noem has repeatedly claimed that she has spent "months" examining this issue. At National Review Online Tuesday, she wrote, "Since November, my team and I have worked to find the best way to defend women's sports effectively- not just to feel good, but to do good. We have to be able to win in court. It is for that reason that I asked the South Dakota state legislature to make revisions to HB 1217."

This statement seems reasonable until you contrast it with the fact that just a few weeks ago Noem publicly stated that she supported HB 1217 as passed by the legislature and looked forward to signing it "very soon." If she had been examining the issue "Since November," what, then, explains her public endorsement of the bill four months later in March, then her swift reversal just a week after that public endorsement?

The only way to reconcile these two claims while assuming her honesty is for her alleged months of work and consultation with "legal scholars" to have led to her support for the bill that she announced in March. Yet that's not what she ultimately followed through on, which leads one to believe she's not telling the truth about her "work" on this issue "since November." The only way to reasonably put these two items together, then, is to surmise Noem changed her position for political reasons and is attempting to cover it up.

That's not the only self-contradiction she's engaged in during this whole affair. Another is her claim that a major reason she vetoed the legislation is the threat of lawsuits.

As passed, this bill was a trial lawyer's dream. It would have immediately been enjoined had I signed it into law, meaning that no girls in South Dakota would have been protected," she writes. Her article repeatedly alleges these potential legal threats yet never once explains from whence she believes they stem.

Based on the fact that other states have passed similar laws, including just last week Arkansas, one might surmise that other governors don't believe these laws present trial lawyer bonanzas, or are not afraid of them. In Idaho, which passed the first girls' sports protection bill, the NCAA has not sued nor withdrawn from the state, which Noem alleged on Tucker Carlson might happen in South Dakota.

THERE IS A LOT MORE HERE at the Federalist.

Photo from Youtube.